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Unit (2019)

Information on this page, including unit offerings, is from the 2019 academic year.

Processes in Animal Disease (VET375)

Organisational Unit Veterinary Medicine
Credit Points 3
Availability MURDOCH: S1-internal
Teaching Timetables Murdoch S1
Description This unit examines the fundamental processes of disease demonstrated by higher vertebrates, such as vascular disturbances, inflammation, necrosis, healing, adaptive changes and diseases of abnormal DNA processing. Students learn practical macroscopic and microscopic interpretation skills using case studies from the School's diagnostic pathology service. The relationships between gross change, histological change, the underlying pathological process and its implications for treatment and prognosis are emphasised. Clinical material will form the basis for problem-oriented learning and developing skills in scientific communication.
Unit Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the unit you should be able to:
1. Define, explain and describe the basic disease PROCESSES - hyperaemia; haemorrhage; oedema; ischaemia; thrombosis; inflammation; healing; cell death; adaptive changes; neoplasia; teratological disease and accumulations of excess material in tissues. This should be in terms of:
a. Providing examples to show how and when disease processes might occur;
b. The stepwise progression of the process;
c. What the process will look like grossly and histologically;
d. What outcomes that process will have on a living animal at the time you examine it and what might further develop if the process progresses;
e. How that process relates to and influences other processes;
f. Predicting and analysing how these processes might affect organs and species that have not been used directly in the examples through the course.
2. Write and talk about these processes in a logical, consistent and scientific manner by developing accuracy and precision in your observational and descriptive skills.
3. Describe and broadly attempt to interpret the pathological processes in gross and histological specimens.
4. These objectives are also essential for all workshops and seminars. To achieve these objectives in these sessions you will need to be able to:
a. Recall, describe and recognise the normal anatomical and histological features of the major organ systems of the common domestic species. This involves organs such as lung, liver, kidney, heart, skin and gastrointestinal tract, but may involve others from time to time;
b. Recognise the typical features of particular disease processes in gross and histological specimens, describe and interpret these and predict the potential outcome for that individual or the group of animals;
c. Predict how features of the change seen in gross and histological specimens, will affect that outcome e.g. age of change, aggressiveness of change etc;
d. Understand that different disease processes typify certain disease agents. Consequently the recognition of a specific disease process will enable you to make suggestions regarding the possible cause of the disease process;
e. Use a microscope and be able to examine histological sections of diseased tissues in a logical and consistent manner; and outline the use of various common histological stains.
Timetabled Learning Activities Lectures: 3 x 1 hour per week;
Workshop - gross and histopathology: 1 x 2 hours pr week;
Seminars: 6 x 1 hour per semester.
Unit Learning Experiences Lectures:
This unit comprises a series of core lectures in general pathology. The lectures are structured to systematically review the ways the body responds to injury and 'disease causing agents' over time, starting with a 'big picture' overview and then drilling down into the detailed mechanisms underpinning each disease process. At the end of each lecture topic there is a review lecture to give an overview of the disease process that has been presented in the previous lectures.
The lectures focus on the key disease responses of higher vertebrates and are illustrated with examples from a variety of species. The lectures are supported by a core e-textbook (available online to enrolled students via a LMS link; hosted by the Murdoch Library), and are also recorded using the Lecture Capture System (LCS). The lecture PowerPoint slides, LCS recordings, library link to e-textbook and unit information guide are all available via your MyUnits page.
Workshops
The purpose of the workshops is to:
a) help you learn how to recognise disease at a gross and microscopic level,
b) think about the consequences of the disease process to the animal, and
c) apply the theory you have learnt in the lectures with what happens in real life.

The workshops are structured to follow the lectures and they cover aspects of a specific disease process each week. To assist linking theory with practice we will start the workshops with a 'mind mapping' session to review the theoretical concepts underpinning the disease process under review for that week. The mind mapping session will be followed by some gross and histological pathology case examples that we will work through in small groups and then discuss with the entire workshop class.

Seminars: These are 'trouble-shooting' sessions to address learning issues as they arise throughout the semester, and to ensure the students understand and learn from errors made in the quizzes (which they must submit throughout the semester). 1 seminar will specifically address research skills i.e. how to: a. locate and cite appropriate reference sources; and b. how to critically read a scientific manuscript. This is done in order to not only prepare them for the mid-semester assignment for this unit, but also to build upon their research skills so they are appropriately prepared for future units in the DVM program.
Assessment Weekly pre-workshop quizzes and a mid-semester theory and practical online assignment during the semester provide continuous assessment. The purpose of the pre-workshop quizzes is to help students to understand and undertake the activities scheduled for during the workshop. The purpose of the assignment is to allow students to demonstrate they can:
a) explain how the various disease processes occur and;
b) to examine, recognise, describe, interpret and communicate diagnostic information.
You are allowed to work in groups; however you must submit your own work for assessment.
A closed book, 2 hour practical exam and a closed book 2 hour theory exam will be held. Material from all lectures, seminars and workshops will be examined based on the learning objectives provided.
Prerequisites Enrolment in Veterinary Biology; VET260 Veterinary Structure and Function I; VET271 Veterinary Structure and Function II; VET272 Comparative Mammalian Biochemistry; VET273 Veterinary Structure and Function III; VET 274 Veterinary Structure and Function IV.
Notes This unit examines the fundamental processes of disease that are manifest by higher vertebrates, such as vascular disturbances, inflammation, necrosis and diseases of abnormal DNA processing. Students learn practical macroscopic and microscopic interpretation skills using case studies from the School's diagnostic pathology service. The relationships between gross change, histological change, the underlying pathological process and its implications for treatment and prognosis are emphasised. Clinical material will form the basis for problem-oriented learning and developing skills in scientific communication.
Appears in these Courses/Majors:
see individual structures for context
Veterinary Science (BSc)+(DVM) [New in 2014]
Internet Access RequirementsMurdoch units normally include an online component comprising materials, discussions, lecture recordings and assessment activities. All students, regardless of their location or mode of study, need to have access to and be able to use computing devices with browsing capability and a connection to the Internet via Broadband (Cable, ADSL or Mobile) or Wireless. The Internet connection should be readily available and allow large amounts of data to be streamed or downloaded (approximately 100MB per lecture recording). Students also need to be able to enter into online discussions and submit assignments online.

Contacts

Unit Coordinator
VET375
Associate Professor Rick Last
Associate Professor Veterinary Patholgy

Murdoch Campus
t: 9360 2297
e: Rick.Last@murdoch.edu.au
o: 250.2.009 - Veterinary Biology, Murdoch Campus
Unit Contacts
VET375

MURDOCH: S1-Internal
Associate Professor Rick Last
Associate Professor Veterinary Patholgy

Murdoch Campus
t: 9360 2297
e: Rick.Last@murdoch.edu.au
o: 250.2.009 - Veterinary Biology, Murdoch Campus
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