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Unit (2019)

Information on this page, including unit offerings, is from the 2019 academic year.

Indigenous Peoples, Law and Society (LLB203)

School School of Law
Credit Points 3
Availability MURDOCH: S1-internal
Teaching Timetables Murdoch S1
Description Examines the relationship between Indigenous people, law and society and involves situating Australian law in its historical, political and societal contexts as it relates to Indigenous peoples. It examines Indigenous legal issues in Australia, including the history and development of Australian law, impact of that law on Indigenous people, and Indigenous perspectives on that law. It provides valuable student learning experiences in understanding plurality of Australian law, including understanding, discussing, and analysing particular themes and legal topics in relation to Indigenous peoples.
Unit Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this unit you should be able to:
1. Demonstrate understanding of the reasoning and contexts in which Australian law operates and has operated in relation to Indigenous peoples in Australia.
2. Analyse and evaluate different perspectives on the law utilising set readings.
3. Identify, discuss and analyse legal issues relating to Indigenous people.
4. Effectively research a range of legal and non-legal sources to develop logical and reasoned arguments.
5. Be able to reflect on and to effectively communicate your findings.
Timetabled Learning Activities 2 hour lecture weekly. 24 hours of lectures/seminars shared with LEG code.
Unit Learning Experiences Formal teaching time for this unit consists of a weekly 2 hour lecture/seminar. The purpose of the lecture component of this unit is to provide a framework for students to develop their historical and contemporary understanding of contexts in which Australian law has applied to Indigenous peoples. This includes offering a range of perspectives.

The seminar component provides a forum for students to apply and extend their understanding of legal principles introduced in the lectures. This includes case studies and methodologies from legal and non-legal sources that will assist them to develop important skills/learning outcomes.
Assessment Report on a case study - 50%
Written Exam -50%
Prerequisites BJU100 Australian Legal System
Exclusions LEG203 Indigenous Peoples, Law and Society.
Appears in these Courses/Majors:
see individual structures for context
Law (LLB); (LLB(Hons)) [New in 2014]
Law + Arts [Combined] (LLB)+(BA)
Law + Arts [Combined] (LLB)+(BA) [New in 2014]
Law + Business [Combined] (LLB)+(BBus)
Law + Business [Combined] (LLB)+(BBus) [New in 2014]
Law + Commerce [Combined] (LLB)+(BCom)
Law + Communication [Combined] (BCommun)+(LLB)
Law + Criminology [Combined] (BCrim)+(LLB) [New in 2018]
Law + Global Security [Combined] (LLB)+(BGS) [New in 2019]
Law + International Business [Combined] (LLB)+(BIB)
Law + Psychology [Combined] (LLB)+(BA) [New in 2018]
Law + Psychology [Combined] (LLB)+(BSc)
Law + Science [Combined] (LLB)+(BSc) [New in 2014]
Law - Graduate Entry (LLB) [New in 2017]
Appears in these Minors Australian Indigenous Studies
Internet Access RequirementsMurdoch units normally include an online component comprising materials, discussions, lecture recordings and assessment activities. All students, regardless of their location or mode of study, need to have access to and be able to use computing devices with browsing capability and a connection to the Internet via Broadband (Cable, ADSL or Mobile) or Wireless. The Internet connection should be readily available and allow large amounts of data to be streamed or downloaded (approximately 100MB per lecture recording). Students also need to be able to enter into online discussions and submit assignments online.
Indigenous Peoples, Law and Society (LEG203) - as for LLB203 except as follows
School School of Law
Credit Points 3
Availability MURDOCH: S1-internal, S1-external
Teaching Timetables Murdoch S1
Unit Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this unit you should be able to:
1. Demonstrate understanding ofDiscuss the reasoning and contexts in which Australian law operates and has operated in relation to Indigenous peoples in Australia.
2. Analyse and evaluate different perspectives on the law utilising set readings.
3. Identify, discuss and analyse principles underlying Australian law which have been applied to Indigenous peoples.
4. Effectively research a range of legal and non-legal sources to develop logical and reasoned argument and 5. Effectively communicate your findingss.
5. Be able to reflect on and to effectively communicate your findings.
Timetabled Learning Activities 2 hour lecture weekly. 24 hours of lectures/seminars shared with LLB code.
Unit Learning Experiences Formal teaching time for this unit consists of a weekly 2 hour lecture/seminar. The purpose of the lecture component of this unit is to provide a framework for students to develop their historical and contemporary understanding of contexts in which Australian law has applied to Indigenous peoples. This includes offering a range of perspectives.

The seminar component provides a forum for students to apply and extend their understanding of principles introduced in the lectures. This includes case studies, and perspectives from legal and non-legal sources that will assist them to develop effective research, critical thinking and communication skills.
Assessment The assessment is designed to allow students an opportunity to examine and test their understanding of how Australian law has impacted Indigenous people and been utilised in relation to them including situating the law in its cultural, historical and political contexts. The Assessment will comprise of an essay plan worth 20% and an essay worth - 40%. There will also be a final exam worth 40% of 2 hours duration. Students will receive comprehensive feedback on their assessment tasks.
Prerequisites Nil.
Exclusions LLB203 Indigenous Peoples, Law and Society.
Appears in these Courses/Majors:
see individual structures for context
Bachelor of Criminology (BCrim) [New in 2018]
Crime Science (BCrim) [New in 2018]
Criminal Behaviour (BCrim) [New in 2018]
Criminology + Communication [Combined] (BCrim)+(BCommun)
Criminology + Forensic Biology and Toxicology [Combined] (BCrim)+(BSc)
Criminology + Global Security [Combined] (BCrim)+(BGS) [New in 2019]
Criminology + Psychology [Combined] (BCrim)+(BA) [New in 2018]
Law + Criminology [Combined] (BCrim)+(LLB) [New in 2018]
Legal Studies (BCrim) [New in 2018]
White Collar and Corporate Crime (BCrim)
Appears in these Minors Law and Justice
Internet Access RequirementsMurdoch units normally include an online component comprising materials, discussions, lecture recordings and assessment activities. All students, regardless of their location or mode of study, need to have access to and be able to use computing devices with browsing capability and a connection to the Internet via Broadband (Cable, ADSL or Mobile) or Wireless. The Internet connection should be readily available and allow large amounts of data to be streamed or downloaded (approximately 100MB per lecture recording). Students also need to be able to enter into online discussions and submit assignments online.

Contacts

Unit Coordinator
LLB203
Associate Professor Anna Copeland
Director SCALES

Murdoch Campus
t: 9360 2980
e: a.copeland@murdoch.edu.au
o: 465.2.103 - Law, Murdoch Campus
LEG203
Ms Anna Notley
P/T Teaching Casual

e: A.Notley@murdoch.edu.au
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